How SD-WAN assures uptime while easing complexity

ATCHISON FRAZER | June 6, 2018

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If you have upgraded your laptop or even your phone within the last few years, it's possible you have had to buy a few adapters. Many of these devices have dropped once-ubiquitous I/O like USB-A and the headphone jack in favor of a few multi-function ports, creating the need for dongles to support older accessories. Traditional WAN vs. SD-WAN: Complexity vs. simplicity In many WANs, having to juggle different carriers while supporting new and old applications can create similar complexity.

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