Email Security Customer Testimonial - Ping Network Solutions

Learn how Ping Network Solutions in Scotland uses Cisco Email Security, Advanced Malware Protection (AMP) and Advanced Phishing Protection (APP) to secure their O365 deployment. And Ping practices what they preach…they are not only a customer but they are a Cisco reseller as well.

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CablesAndKits

CablesAndKits is a world class provider of Cisco hardware, a wide range of Cisco replacement parts and other network accessories. We also specialize in fiber optic, Ethernet, and other premise wiring products, server room, and data center infrastructure including equipment racks and shelving, power cables and power management products. As experts in awesome, we are sure to add value and success to your business by offering same day shipping on most products, as well as a 100% satisfaction guarantee, along with an industry-leading Lifetime Warranty...

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Enterprise Mobility, Mobile Infrastructure

SA and NSA: The Difference Between 5G Architectures

Article | June 16, 2023

Choosing the right 5G architecture is crucial for enhancing operations while keeping scalability and budget in mind. Learn whether SA or NSA is more suitable for your business needs with this article. 1. Introduction to 5G Network Architectures 2. What is 5G SA? 2.1 Characteristics of SA Architecture 2.2 Benefits of SA Architecture 3. What is 5G NSA? 3.1 Characteristics of NSA Architecture 3.2 Benefits of NSA Architecture 4. Factors to Consider When Choosing Between SA and NSA 4.1 Cost Implications of Each Architecture 4.2 Future Implications of Each Architecture 5. Conclusion 1. Introduction to 5G Network Architectures Widespread implementation of 5G is transforming how businesses across verticals operate, providing enhanced speed, low latency, and massive connectivity. The advancements in 5G system architecture enable new use cases, from autonomous vehicles to smart cities. There are currently two types of 5G network architecture, namely 5G standalone (5G SA) and 5G non-standalone (5G NSA). These two architectures differ in how they connect to the existing 4G infrastructure, the type of equipment required, and the level of network independence. Therefore, understanding the difference between SA and NSA is crucial for companies and organizations implementing 5G architecture. 2. What is 5G SA? 5G SA architecture is an entirely new technology that uses 5G core network architecture, independent of the current 4G LTE network. It has various use cases, such as combining 5G with AI and edge use cases. 2.1 Characteristics of SA Architecture Independent Network: All components of the architecture, including the 5G core architecture, radio access network, and user equipment, are not reliant on any 4G technology. High Performance: 5G SA architecture is optimized for high performance and low latency, enabling fast data transfer rates and near-instantaneous response times. Distributed Architecture: This allows efficient resource allocation and dynamic management of network resources. End-to-End Encryption: It provides end-to-end encryption, which ensures that data is secure and protected from unauthorized access. Higher Cost: 5G SA architecture is more expensive to implement than NSA architecture due to the need for a fully independent 5G network infrastructure. 2.2 Benefits of SA Architecture Low Latency: Applications of 5G that require real-time processing are only possible with SA architecture. Customization: As SA does not depend on existing network architecture, it can be tailored to company requirements. It also enables network slicing for 5G enterprise private network use cases. Security: End-to-end encryptions ensure a more secure network, and 5G network slicing keeps various access levels separate. Scalability: 5G architecture is designed to be highly scalable and handle large volumes of data and devices. Future-proofing: SA architecture will be able to support upcoming 5G features and capabilities by design. 3. What is 5G NSA? 5G NSA provides a transition into 'true' 5G architecture by incorporating 4G network infrastructure for deployment. 3.1 Characteristics of NSA Architecture Non-Independent Network: 5G NSA architecture is designed to leverage the existing 4G infrastructure to deliver 5G services. Transition to SA: NSA offers lower latencies and faster speeds than 4G LTE without deploying 5G architecture. Integrated Deployment: 5G NSA can be deployed quickly since it integrates existing infrastructure. Limited Scalability: As it relies on the existing 4G infrastructure, NSA is limited in scaling. Low Scalability: There is a lower limit on how many devices can join the network and the data volume that can be processed on NSA. 3.2 Benefits of NSA Architecture Faster Deployment: 5G NSA architecture can be deployed more rapidly than SA architecture. Easier Integration: 4G integration with existing networks is easier since it uses architecture. Cost-effective: 5G NSA architecture is generally less expensive to implement as it doesn't require a complete overhaul of the existing infrastructure to a 5G core architecture. Improvement Over 4G: While not providing the speed and low latency of 'true' 5G, NSA offers significant improvements over 4G networks. 4. Factors to Consider When Choosing Between SA and NSA 4.1 Cost Implications of Each Architecture SA architecture requires a complete overhaul of the existing infrastructure, which can result in higher infrastructure and deployment costs. However, SA architecture can be more cost-effective in the long run due to its future-proof design and ability to provide greater scalability and customization. On the other hand, NSA architecture leverages the existing 4G infrastructure, resulting in lower infrastructure and deployment costs. However, upgrading and maintaining an existing 4G network to support 5G technology can be complex and may result in higher operational costs in the long run. 4.2 Future Implications of Each Architecture SA architecture is designed to be future-proof and scalable, supporting upcoming 5G features and capabilities. This can give organizations greater flexibility and agility to respond to changing business needs and emerging technologies. On the other hand, NSA architecture may be less future-proof and require additional investments in infrastructure and resources to support new 5G features and capabilities. 5. Conclusion While NSA architecture may offer lower upfront costs and a faster deployment timeline, SA architecture may be more future-proof and scalable in the long run. Choosing the appropriate 5G architecture is a critical determinant for organizations aiming to utilize 5G technology in building a connected industry of the future. Organizations must evaluate their requirements and consider each architecture's short and long-term costs and operational implications before making a decision.

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Enterprise Mobility

Edge use cases need a 5G and beyond user plane

Article | June 15, 2023

Emerging virtual and hybrid private 5G solutions are enabling communication service providers (CSPs) to address a large number of new consumer and enterprise edge use cases. Each of these edge use cases will require a specific network deployment model and edge user plane connectivity. That’s why we’ve designed our 5G edge user plane to tackle five distinct key capabilities: support of flexible network deployments, 3GPP dual-mode support, integrated Gi LAN services, integrated probing with edge analytics and edge exposure enablement. Let’s dive into this blog post to learn how the powerful 5G edge user plane is unlocking new 5G edge use cases. How technological innovation creates value and benefits society has always interested me, influencing my work as a mobile network technologist and sales professional. Since mobile data was introduced in late 90s, both mobile network technology and mobile consumer use cases have evolved enormously. Indeed, a rapid increase in connectivity speed and the introduction of smartphones have pushed the market to adopt mobile web and video and create thousands of new applications. However, sometimes ‘killer use cases’ require both business case and application ecosystem maturity. One example is video conferencing, one of the key services 3G was designed for but was only introduced when the over-the-top (OTT) vendors disrupted the content provider market and popularized social media. Creation of mobile technology has indeed its own innovation cycles and research feeds and therefore can't depend on market pull, but you can draw the conclusion that the time to value greatly benefits when the broad business and technology ecosystem in the value chain collaborate and co-create solutions. Precisely, what’s really exciting about 5G is that it coincides with the maturity of other two disruptive technology enablers for end applications: artificial intelligence (AI) and cloud edge computing. It also comes at a moment when there’s both an urgent need and huge financial support to digitalize society and industry. In fact, more than ever, we are witnessing a close collaboration between technology and business ecosystems. Over the past few years, there have been a large number of public-private consortiums to feed service requirements into 5G standards, explore and validate the value of 5G technology. For example, just to name few, the 5G alliance for connected Industries and automation (5G-ACIA) or European 5G infrastructure Public Private Partnership (PPP) projects. For years, 3GPP standards have been preparing to define advanced 5G connectivity solutions for edge computing and vertical digitalization use cases. In addition, all sorts of consumer and enterprise edge applications are being developed at the same pace in many areas such advanced video processing, AI analytics, immersive gaming, smart grid applications, automated guided vehicles (AGVs) controls or industry automation. The edge ecosystem is particularly complex and involves different players. One key pillar is the wireless connectivity service CSPs offer. 5G-ACIA introduced the concept of virtual private and hybrid private 5G solutions, two emerging solutions that CSPs are exploring to complement their private 5G network offerings. Such solutions allow CSPs to leverage their existing public networks and offer new services in an agile and cost-effective manner using new 5G capabilities such as network slicing. In order to address edge use cases, virtual and hybrid private 5G solutions need to bring the user plane connectivity to the edge by deploying 5G edge user plane functions. The 5G edge user plane supports flexible network deployments One key learning from industry experimentation with 5G is that each use case brings a unique combination of connectivity requirements, in terms of end-to-end performance (uplink and downlink latency, jitter, packet loss and throughput), data privacy and security, robustness, wide vs local area coverage and mobility. Latency and security requirements drive the selection of the edge location, which can be the enterprise premise, CSP access or regional data center or even the extended public edge such as content delivery networks (CDN) content provider or a hyper cloud provider’s (HCP) edge data center. For example, a mobile gaming application can be located in the CSP regional data center or HCP edge, whereas video processing and AI for a factory automation application is located on the factory premise. Also edge distribution can be accounted by CSP for those use cases which produce significant amount of data such as fixed wireless access (FWA) to optimize backhaul costs. Ericsson has a vast experience supporting and driving the ecosystem to realize time critical communication use cases at scale and has conducted detailed latency analysis for different type of deployments. The RAN deployment needs to be carefully planned according to the specific use case performance characteristics. Some use cases can be achieved with existing macro RAN environment -4G or non-standalone 5G-, with macro RAN standalone 5G with or without dedicated quality of service (QoS) profiles or even may require network slicing to partition macro RAN. In contrast, some other use cases will need dedicated RAN deployments. In addition, most use cases will benefit from a dedicated edge user plane function, as it provides a higher level of performance and robustness. In summary, the concrete edge use cases to be offered and CSP’s own solution preferences drive the type of network solution and deployment, which can be a private 5G network, a virtual or a hybrid 5G private network using existing macro or dedicated RAN, with or without network slicing. The edge 5G user plane function should allow for such deployment flexibility and enable the different edge use cases characteristics. Ericsson Local Packet Gateway (LPG) addresses this by: Supporting any access technology, radio deployment model and RAN vendor Seamlessly integrating with Ericsson’s existing dual-mode 5G Core. which is prepared for slicing, efficient routing to edge (also called edge breakout) and advanced QOS and many other 5G edge features described in more detail in next section. Supporting a fast time to service, deployment simplicity and a very low footprint enabling deployment at scale in any type of edge location, up to on enterprise premises. See our previous LPG 5G edge user plane: key requirements for success for details. Providing a high level of robustness and failure resilience by means of a cloud native user plane application designed for high availability and fault resilience, support of geo-redundancy and support of 3GPP control plane and user plane split (CUPS) interface which can be deployed in full mesh with multiple control planes. User plane can also be deployed as a dedicated function within a slice to secure further characteristics and isolation or as a shared function for various slices. 5G edge user plane should enable transition from 4G to more sophisticated 5G connectivity Most of CSPs are embracing edge opportunities. They are viewing the opportunities as an evolution of their existing offerings rather than a revolution, meaning existing 4G enterprise use cases will still need to be supported for some time as the ecosystem matures to support time-critical communications type of use cases. This means 5G edge user plane should be dual-mode and support such a wide breadth of technology. 5G edge user plane should support both 3GPP compliant serving/packet gateway user function (S/PGW-U) and user plane function (UPF) and evolve with advanced UPF features for time-critical communications, such as more stringent end to end QoS and transmission robustness for ultra-reliable low latency communications (URLLC) or Ethernet connectivity for advanced edge industrial use cases. It should also support 5G peak rates and do not degrade use cases performance characteristics. It should also support dynamic edge routing solutions which are efficient, deployable by multipurpose terminals and mobility proof such as dynamic network slice selection which is preferrable to UPF as uplink classifier as starting solution until standardization evolves. 5G edge user plane should work in conjunction with the CSP’s dual-mode core system, which supports dynamic slicing orchestration, dynamic slice selection, ultra-reliable low latency communications and advanced 5G edge connectivity features such as different service continuity and user plane re-anchoring modes depending on mobility and application resilience needs. Ericsson’s dual-mode 5G Core with Local Packet Gateway provides such advanced 5G connectivity in a pre-verified manner. In fact, the Ericsson Local Packet Gateway Cloud Native Function (CNF) is based on the same software as the Ericsson Packet Core Gateway (PCG), the market leading cloud-native user plane, which is deployed in 5G live networks today. Such deployment flexibility in edge user plane allows CSP to offer distinct use cases. For example, CSPs can offer mobile gaming service by deploying a cloud virtual reality (VR) gaming center application in their regional data centers. Connectivity with guaranteed low latency QoS can be provided by a dedicated 5G network slice with the dedicated Ericsson Local Packet Gateway, deployed close to the gaming application and connected to the CSP’s existing central core network. The mobile gaming application can use a portable device such as VR glasses or use a multi-purpose smartphone or tablet that supports dynamic slice selection. CSP can reuse their existing public network and macro 5G RAN. As another example, CSP can offer 5G edge connectivity to factories or logistic centers for augmented reality (AR) quality inspection. The AR application is deployed on the factory premise and needs an ultra-reliable and low-latency QoS connection to process in real time all the factory images. This is provided by a dedicated Ericsson Local Packet Gateway with ultra-reliable low latency QoS and redundant configuration being deployed on premises. Edge use cases will require user plane services beyond 3GPP There is a set of non-standardized user plane functions deployed in today’s networks (also called GI/N6 LAN functions) for mobile broadband service that would be also relevant for edge use cases. These functions can be categorized as: Traffic acceleration and optimization of access resources e.g., transport layer optimizers or advanced video traffic shapers Network services e.g., carrier grade NAT devices or external load balancers Service aware traffic monitoring and enforcements needed to realize customized CSP charging data plans or comply with some country regulatory such as content filters Network security functions protecting CSP infrastructure and UEs of security attacks such as subscriber firewalls or distributed denial (DDoS) mitigation systems, and Service chain policers and forwarders to chain and offload these GI/N6 LAN functions. Those can be integrated with operator policy framework to compose and program a unique data pipeline which addresses the specific connectivity needs of a given subscriber and application in the context of a certain use case The current GI/N6 LAN market is very fragmented and addressed by many different vendor specific user plane functions. These functions are deployed as separate appliances or virtualized functions, each with their management system, policy integration and cloud orchestration system which significantly increases CSP’s total cost of ownership (TCO) when deploying and managing them. As CSPs start their edge journey they will need to bring some of these GI/N6 functions to the edge. A very simple and cost-efficient strategy to consolidate these functions in one single edge user plane function. This approach is being adopted by Ericsson Local Packet Gateway: it integrates these functions, including advanced integrated Packet Core Firewall, together with the UPF/S/PGW-U functions. This dramatically reduces the TCO and provides a single hop to the end application, which reduces further the latency. Ericsson Local Packet Gateway also allows to compose and tune the set user plane functions applied to a given traffic in one configuration click, which allows to customize the connectivity for each edge use case. Another consideration is that these GI/N6 functions were designed for legacy mobile broadband. This means they will need to evolve to support 5G peak user throughput rates and new 5G segment requirements, e.g., traffic optimizations should focus on optimizing the throughput of uplink transmissions and reducing the overall jitter and latency. Service aware charging models will evolve as 5G gets monetized, security for edge enterprise connectivity will keep evolving as well. Technological innovation in this space is a must for any edge user plane vendor and should be holistic considering the entire ecosystem and end-to-end solution behavior. As one example, edge user plane can leverage 3GPP exposure interfaces for application detection, use collaborative solutions with content providers or RAN to optimize traffic delivery or even adapt traffic optimizations to new end to end rate adaptation mechanisms such as low latency low loss scalable throughput (L4S). Ericsson, as an end-to-end network provider and key contributor to 5G standardization, is working actively in this space. Edge connectivity needs to be monitored and assured CSPs need to monitor, troubleshoot, and assure the edge user plane connectivity. In many cases the CSP organizations dealing with enterprises services have their own analytic and management systems. Those systems need to evolve to provide visibility of the 5G encrypted communication, up to on enterprise premise and without compromising 5G security and provide advanced insights to meet the stringent service level agreements of edge use cases. Example of user plane data feeds are traffic packet and patterns statistics, key performance indicators at transport level or service quality of experience estimates per application, area of interest, slice and subscriber type. CSP analytic use cases will also evolve, meaning network assurance and service experience management use cases will increasingly adopt AI/ML models with distinct and very demanding UP data sets running in parallel. External probing solutions were not designed for these requirements. The cost of evolving and deploying such solutions to thousands of edges is unaffordable. Ericsson Local Packet Gateway addresses this challenge by supporting integrated dual-mode probing capabilities which includes rich, granular data with pre-processed data and advanced data collection profiles avoiding the need of deploying external taps, packet broker and probes at edge. Software probes are a unique Ericsson dual mode 5G Core feature – a feature that’s very popular with our customers for public network and enterprise solutions. CSP will also introduce network data analytics function (NWDAF) function to enable 5G analytics for further 5G automation, new exposure APIs for verticals and data efficiency. An NWDAF can collect edge user plane and public network data to provide real time analytics which can be consumed by the network functions or by the end edge application to improve further the edge connectivity. Example of those analytics are user mobility, network congestion, quality of service, service experience or abnormal user behavior. Ideally, the NWDAF should be distributed at the edge and deployed co-located to the edge user plane for data efficiency, security and lower actuation latency. Ericsson NWDAF supports such distributed and co-located deployment and analytics and can collect pre-standard data from the Local Packet Gateway data until 3GPP rel-18 specifies UPF event exposure. Edge exposure for advanced edge connectivity Exposure through APIs on the edge is becoming increasingly important for CSPs to enable new services, increase their relevance in the 5G ecosystem and become more attractive partners for hyperscale cloud providers, application ecosystems and other players. Edge applications will be able to consume network capabilities and data to provide advanced services and innovate. Data extracted from edge user plane function will be of high value. For example, to determine the exact UE sessions being anchored by a given edge user plane, the actual monitored QoS, etc. Such exposure capabilities in edge user plane allows application to adapt the content delivery or reconfigure dynamically the connectivity, e.g., change dynamically the negotiated QoS or influence edge routing. As mentioned previously, NWDAF user plane analytics can be also exposed for advanced edge use cases. Ericsson is already working with our customers to create new edge use cases using Ericsson Local Packet Gateway and Edge Exposure Server. Stay tuned! Summary: In this blog post we’ve explained the different considerations that need to be taken into account when selecting the 5G edge user plane, and how it enables flexible virtual private and hybrid 4G private solution deployments and address the user experience idiosyncrasy of myriads of edge use cases. The 5G edge user plane has to be small, cost efficient, easy to deploy but still extremely powerful and advanced in terms of dual connectivity and added value features. Ericsson Local Packet Gateway is designed with all these capabilities in mind and integrates seamlessly with existing CSP dual-mode 5G Core, delivering edge use cases was never that easy.

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Network Infrastructure, Network Management

5G Small Cells: The Future of Wireless Networks

Article | July 27, 2023

5G small cells form the backbone of the modern wireless networks. Learn more about this technology is revolutionizing 5G deployment and enabling various use cases across industries in this article. Contents 1 Introduction to 5G Small Cells for Modern Businesses 2 5G Small Cells: Overview 2.1 Characteristics of 5G Small Cells 2.2 How Small Cells Fit into 5G Architecture 3 Benefits of 5G Small Cells for Businesses 3.1 Improved Coverage and Capacity 3.2 Enhanced Network Performance 3.3 Lower Latency 3.4 Cost-effectiveness 4 Use Cases for 5G Small Cells 4.1 Urban Areas 4.2 Rural Areas 4.3 Indoor Environments 5 Conclusion 1 Introduction to 5G Small Cells for Modern Businesses Small cells are low-power radio access nodes that operate in licensed and unlicensed spectrum bands and are typically deployed in areas with high demand for wireless connectivity. They are a vital component of the 5G wireless network architecture and are designed to complement traditional cell towers, providing improved coverage, network capacity, and faster data speeds. Small cells come in several types, including femtocells, picocells, and microcells, and can be deployed according to the use case. 2 5G Small Cells: Overview 2.1 Characteristics of 5G Small Cells 5G small cells are characterized by small form factors and are designed to be compact and discreet for deployment in various settings, such as urban areas, rural areas, indoor environments, and public spaces. In addition, they consume less power than traditional cell towers, making them more energy-efficient. They also operate on high-frequency bands, which enables them to provide faster data speeds and lower latency than traditional cell towers, which makes small cells essential for 5G. The 5G small cell architecture can be deployed in dense networks, providing better coverage and capacity in areas where traditional cell towers may not be able to reach. Also, a 5G small cell antenna can be configured to provide seamless handoffs between cells, ensuring users have a consistent and uninterrupted wireless experience. These characteristics make them ideal for specific 5G use cases, which will be explored further in the article. 2.2 How Small Cells Fit into 5G Architecture Small cells and 5G evolution are closely linked, and this technology is an ideal solution for future wireless networks. They offer greater capacity, coverage, and flexibility than traditional cell towers, allowing them to meet the demands of an increasingly connected world. By operating on high-frequency bands and being deployed in dense networks, small cells in 5G can provide faster data speeds, lower latency, and better coverage than previous generations of wireless networks. Additionally, their small form factor and flexible deployment options allow for use cases like private 5G networks that revolutionize industries. 3 Benefits of 5G Small Cells for Businesses 5G networks will support a massive increase in connected devices, including smartphones, IoT sensors, and other devices. Small cells are critical for achieving the full potential of 5G networks and the exciting new applications and services they will enable. 3.1 Improved Coverage and Capacity 5G small cells offer improved coverage over traditional cell towers in certain situations, particularly in urban areas. Buildings and other obstacles interfere with wireless signals, so the connection quality decreases in areas with such infrastructure. By deploying small cells closer to users, the network can provide better coverage and capacity in these areas. Small cells can also be deployed indoors, providing better coverage and capacity in buildings and other enclosed spaces. This is important due to poor wireless range, signal interference from walls, and other obstacles. By deploying small cells indoors, the network can provide better coverage and capacity in these areas, improving the overall wireless experience for users. 3.2 Enhanced Network Performance The deployment of small cells enables network densification, which allows several devices to connect to the network simultaneously. This can help reduce network congestion and improve overall network performance, particularly in urban areas. They can also be configured to provide seamless handoffs between cells, ensuring that users have a consistent and uninterrupted wireless experience. This is important because users often move between different areas with different coverage levels and capacities, providing a streamlined experience. 3.3 Lower Latency Small cells are designed to operate on high-frequency bands, which enables them to provide faster data speeds and lower latency than prior generations of wireless networks. This is especially important for applications that require real-time communication, such as virtual reality, autonomous vehicles, and remote surgery. By providing faster data speeds and lower latency, small cells can help enhance these applications' performance, providing a better overall user experience. 3.4 Cost-effectiveness Small cells offer a cost-effective alternative to traditional cell towers, particularly in urban areas with high land and real estate costs. By mounting 5G small cell antennas on existing infrastructure, such as lampposts and buildings, deployment costs can be lowered. Additionally, small cells can be deployed in a modular fashion, allowing for targeted and cost-effective expansion based on the required coverage and capacity. This approach avoids large-scale and expensive deployments of new infrastructure. Moreover, small cells can be powered by low-cost, low-power sources like solar panels or batteries, reducing ongoing operational costs. Furthermore, small cells consume less power than traditional cell towers, resulting in lower energy costs. 4 Use Cases for 5G Small Cells 4.1 Urban Areas As discussed previously, small cell radio antennas in 5G can improve networks in dense urban environments, alleviating network congestion and improving data speeds. In addition, by deploying small cells in areas with high user demand, network operators can provide targeted coverage and capacity improvements to specific areas, ensuring that users have fast and reliable connectivity. 4.2 Rural Areas Small cells can be used to extend coverage to underserved or unserved areas by traditional cell towers. They can fill in coverage gaps, providing reliable connectivity to users in rural areas that may not have access to high-quality wireless services. This will enable use cases such as remote workforces in rural areas, smart agriculture, and distance education and training. 4.3 Indoor Environments Traditional cell towers may not be able to provide reliable connectivity indoors due to physical barriers such as thick walls and ceilings. Small cells can provide targeted coverage and capacity to specific areas, such as conference rooms or shopping malls, where users require high-quality wireless connectivity. In addition to improving range, small cells can help alleviate network congestion and improve data speeds in high-traffic indoor environments. 5 Final Thoughts Small cells are a crucial element in developing and implementing 5G technology. By leveraging a small form factor and high-frequency band usage, small cells facilitate the deployment of 5G networks in a more cost-effective and targeted manner than traditional cell towers. They support a wide range of use cases by providing reliable and high-quality wireless connectivity to a growing number of devices. They will continue to be a critical technology for businesses and organizations seeking to leverage the benefits of 5G technology.

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Huawei: AR Needs 5G, 5G needs AR

Article | July 6, 2021

Without a robust 5G network, carriers will not be able to take full advantage of new business opportunities surrounding augmented reality (AR). This was the bottom-line message from Huawei’s recent Better World Summit (BWS), which turned the spotlight on “5G+AR.” How the network is designed is another key consideration. If AR headsets are to become lighter and cheaper, offloading compute processing to the network edge and cloud — over stable and low-latency 5G connections — is essential. It is why Huawei advocates a partnership approach, spanning AR collaboration in all three areas: 5G networks, devices, and content. The prize of getting these sorts of partnerships ‘right’ is huge. According to Huawei, working in tandem with a third-party research institute, the AR market will reach a hefty $300 billion with 1.2 billion users by 2025.

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Spotlight

CablesAndKits

CablesAndKits is a world class provider of Cisco hardware, a wide range of Cisco replacement parts and other network accessories. We also specialize in fiber optic, Ethernet, and other premise wiring products, server room, and data center infrastructure including equipment racks and shelving, power cables and power management products. As experts in awesome, we are sure to add value and success to your business by offering same day shipping on most products, as well as a 100% satisfaction guarantee, along with an industry-leading Lifetime Warranty...

Related News

Enterprise Mobility,Mobile OS

MATRIXX Software’s Digital Commerce Platform Available in Microsoft’s Azure Marketplace

MATRIXX | January 27, 2023

5G monetization solutions leader, MATRIXX software, yesterday announced that the MATRIXX Digital Commerce Platform (DCP) is now available on the Microsoft Azure Marketplace, an online store providing software and services to be used with the Azure cloud computing platform. MATRIXX DCP, a cloud native monetization platform gives Communications Services Providers (CSPs) a wide range of monetization options, making it simpler to take advantage of 5G revenue prospects. By installing MATRIXX DCP on Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS), CSPs may take full advantage of the reliable Azure cloud platform's benefits for the vital goal of monetizing new and cutting-edge services. With a no-code, cloud-native, real-time platform, MATRIXX DCP, a 3GPP-compliant converged charging solution, enables telcos to monetize at web scale. With MATRIXX DCP, operators can scale swiftly in the 5G era and beyond, create differentiated digital consumer experiences, and drive innovation. Marc Price, CTO at MATRIXX Software, said, “Multi-cloud deployments are increasingly important for operators around the world, and are defining the next era of telecommunications.” He further added, “MATRIXX empowers our customers to have access to advanced monetization capabilities, wherever they choose to deploy. Microsoft is a trusted cloud ecosystem partner for CSPs, and with MATRIXX DCP in the Microsoft Azure Marketplace, telcos can easily procure and deploy monetization capabilities for emerging services.” About MATRIXX Software Matrix Software provides converged charging and commerce solutions. It’s cloud-native Digital Commerce Platform offers mission-critical, network-grade software that opens new prospects for network monetization. MATRIXX gives service providers the agility they need to quickly build, deploy, and monetize new products and services because to its no-code configuration features. Many of the world’s top IoT players, network infrastructure providers, and communications firms run on the MATRIXX platform. Utilizing business innovation and on-demand customer experience through MATRIXX enables businesses to compete better, produce new revenue, and pursue growth possibilities across markets and verticals.

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Wan Technologies,Wireless,5G

AMD and Viettel Collaborate on 5G Mobile Network Expansion

AMD | December 05, 2022

AMD and Viettel High Tech (Member of Viettel Group) today announced the successful completion of a 5G mobile network field trial deployment conducted by Viettel and powered by AMD Xilinx Zynq™ UltraScale+™ MPSoC devices. As the largest telecom operator in Vietnam serving more than 130 million mobile customers, Viettel High Tech has a rich history of using AMD radio technology with prior 4G deployments and is now accelerating new networks via new 5G remote radio heads. Designed to meet the growing capacity and performance requirements of mobile users globally, the Viettel 5G mobile network is expected to be completed by the end of 2022. AMD is the exclusive radio unit silicon supplier for Viettel’s indigenous 5G radio development. After the successful completion of the first field trial, Zynq MPSoCs are now set to be extended to an additional 300 Macro 8T8R base stations and 900 5G 8T8R Macro radios. The Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC was also chosen by Viettel for its first-generation 64T64R Massive MIMO radio which is currently being optimized for field trials. Viettel is developing the next generation of radios to also include Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC devices, to provide industry-leading integration and higher performance. “Viettel is committed to advancing mobile technology leadership by working closely with AMD to incorporate its adaptable SoC technology into our new generation of 5G networks. Going from VHT's history of making 4G BTS, this decision to scale for the growing demands of 5G was based on evaluating various factors including flexibility, simplification, design stability and the experience of engineers.” Nguyen Vu Ha, general director of Viettel High Tech “5G provides new opportunities to offer higher levels of performance, power efficiency and new services along with increased reliability required to meet the growing data demands of cellular networks,” said Yousef Khalilollahi, corporate vice president of APAC sales, Adaptive and Embedded Computing Group, AMD. “We are proud of our close collaboration with Viettel and remain focused on enabling its mobile network to deliver the optimal end-user experience as well as the flexibility to evolve and grow as Viettel’s user base and required bandwidth continue to increase globally.” About Viettel High Tech As the R&D arm of Viettel Group, Viettel High Tech develops full 5G network architecture including 5 layers: Service/App layers, Core layers, Transportation layers, Access layers, Devices; makes Vietnam one of the few countries that can produce 5G equipment. Collaboration with the leading partners is VHT’s strategy. With the desire to experiment, exchange knowledge, further develop diverse fields, VHT is moving to accompany the international high-tech community. About AMD For more than 50 years AMD has driven innovation in high-performance computing, graphics and visualization technologies. Billions of people, leading Fortune 500 businesses and cutting-edge scientific research institutions around the world rely on AMD technology daily to improve how they live, work and play. AMD employees are focused on building leadership high-performance and adaptive products that push the boundaries of what is possible.

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Network Infrastructure,Network Management,Wan Technologies

Verizon continues to deploy 5G Ultra Wideband faster than expected

Verizon | December 06, 2022

Verizon now covers more than 175 million people with their ultra fast, ultra reliable 5G Ultra Wideband service, and will offer nationwide 5G Ultra Wideband in Q1 2023. The ongoing C-Band rollout is a full 13 months ahead of the original schedule, and continues to accelerate. Less than 21 months after announcing the results of the FCC’s C-band auction and after securing early access to an additional 30 markets this year, Verizon accelerated its build plan and surpassed its goal of reaching 175 million people covered by the end of 2022, a month ahead of schedule. “Our customers don’t stand still and neither does our network. Today, more than one out of every two Americans now have access to 5G Ultra Wideband. We know our customers rely on our service every day and we work for them – continuously enhancing, expanding and improving our wireless network. And as proud as I am to have crossed this milestone, I am equally proud of the way we are building our network – with the most advanced technologies, industry leading security, a robust fiber underpinning and a robust and varied spectrum portfolio. We are building this right. We are building this as a platform for innovation for years to come.” Hans Vestberg, Chairman and CEO of Verizon. Verizon’s 5G Ultra Wideband brings power and performance comparable to a wired broadband internet connection to customers’ pockets. With download speeds up to one gigabit per second and the capacity to support data-heavy actions, 5G Ultra Wideband frees people up to do things on the go that many could only do before when connected to their home internet service. This includes everything from downloading huge documents and seamlessly streaming movies in HD audio and video, to playing console quality games and conducting video chats, video conferencing and FaceTime calls with clear sound and video. Verizon customers have much more to look forward to Verizon will continue to build out its 5G Ultra Wideband network using C-band spectrum providing service for millions more customers in the coming months, but Verizon’s engineers are not losing sight of the other critical components that will give customers the most reliable, secure, and robust experience possible on the Verizon network. In addition to providing greater coverage, especially in rural and suburban areas, Verizon will also enhance capacity by activating 100 MHz of C-Band spectrum in many markets, a significant step up from the 60 MHz of spectrum available when deployment first began. Once all of its licensed spectrum is made available, Verizon will have up to 200 MHz of C-Band spectrum deployed in many markets, which will provide exceptional speed and capacity. Complementing the wide coverage of Verizon’s premier C-Band spectrum, Verizon will continue deploying 5G on mmWave spectrum which provides for exponential capacity in areas with significantly dense populations such as venues, stadiums, arenas, airports, major metro areas, office complexes and more. mmWave will also continue to be used for private network deployments when enterprise customers need the fastest, most robust 5G service available for their enterprise applications from wireless manufacturing solutions to connected vehicles to remote healthcare and more. In addition to making 5G more accessible to more people, Verizon will continue focusing on building out the advanced technologies that provide increased security, reliability and customized experiences for customers. Those advancements include fully deploying the 5G core with Verizon’s proprietary cloud platform built specifically for telco workloads, advancing the fiber network to handle exponential increases in data traffic, continuing massive virtualization of the network to add programmability and flexibility into the network, using artificial intelligence to drive reliability and performance, continuing to develop edge computing capabilities to drive down latency, and continuing to advance antenna configurations to drive speed and efficiency.

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Enterprise Mobility,Mobile OS

MATRIXX Software’s Digital Commerce Platform Available in Microsoft’s Azure Marketplace

MATRIXX | January 27, 2023

5G monetization solutions leader, MATRIXX software, yesterday announced that the MATRIXX Digital Commerce Platform (DCP) is now available on the Microsoft Azure Marketplace, an online store providing software and services to be used with the Azure cloud computing platform. MATRIXX DCP, a cloud native monetization platform gives Communications Services Providers (CSPs) a wide range of monetization options, making it simpler to take advantage of 5G revenue prospects. By installing MATRIXX DCP on Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS), CSPs may take full advantage of the reliable Azure cloud platform's benefits for the vital goal of monetizing new and cutting-edge services. With a no-code, cloud-native, real-time platform, MATRIXX DCP, a 3GPP-compliant converged charging solution, enables telcos to monetize at web scale. With MATRIXX DCP, operators can scale swiftly in the 5G era and beyond, create differentiated digital consumer experiences, and drive innovation. Marc Price, CTO at MATRIXX Software, said, “Multi-cloud deployments are increasingly important for operators around the world, and are defining the next era of telecommunications.” He further added, “MATRIXX empowers our customers to have access to advanced monetization capabilities, wherever they choose to deploy. Microsoft is a trusted cloud ecosystem partner for CSPs, and with MATRIXX DCP in the Microsoft Azure Marketplace, telcos can easily procure and deploy monetization capabilities for emerging services.” About MATRIXX Software Matrix Software provides converged charging and commerce solutions. It’s cloud-native Digital Commerce Platform offers mission-critical, network-grade software that opens new prospects for network monetization. MATRIXX gives service providers the agility they need to quickly build, deploy, and monetize new products and services because to its no-code configuration features. Many of the world’s top IoT players, network infrastructure providers, and communications firms run on the MATRIXX platform. Utilizing business innovation and on-demand customer experience through MATRIXX enables businesses to compete better, produce new revenue, and pursue growth possibilities across markets and verticals.

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Wan Technologies,Wireless,5G

AMD and Viettel Collaborate on 5G Mobile Network Expansion

AMD | December 05, 2022

AMD and Viettel High Tech (Member of Viettel Group) today announced the successful completion of a 5G mobile network field trial deployment conducted by Viettel and powered by AMD Xilinx Zynq™ UltraScale+™ MPSoC devices. As the largest telecom operator in Vietnam serving more than 130 million mobile customers, Viettel High Tech has a rich history of using AMD radio technology with prior 4G deployments and is now accelerating new networks via new 5G remote radio heads. Designed to meet the growing capacity and performance requirements of mobile users globally, the Viettel 5G mobile network is expected to be completed by the end of 2022. AMD is the exclusive radio unit silicon supplier for Viettel’s indigenous 5G radio development. After the successful completion of the first field trial, Zynq MPSoCs are now set to be extended to an additional 300 Macro 8T8R base stations and 900 5G 8T8R Macro radios. The Zynq UltraScale+ MPSoC was also chosen by Viettel for its first-generation 64T64R Massive MIMO radio which is currently being optimized for field trials. Viettel is developing the next generation of radios to also include Zynq UltraScale+ RFSoC devices, to provide industry-leading integration and higher performance. “Viettel is committed to advancing mobile technology leadership by working closely with AMD to incorporate its adaptable SoC technology into our new generation of 5G networks. Going from VHT's history of making 4G BTS, this decision to scale for the growing demands of 5G was based on evaluating various factors including flexibility, simplification, design stability and the experience of engineers.” Nguyen Vu Ha, general director of Viettel High Tech “5G provides new opportunities to offer higher levels of performance, power efficiency and new services along with increased reliability required to meet the growing data demands of cellular networks,” said Yousef Khalilollahi, corporate vice president of APAC sales, Adaptive and Embedded Computing Group, AMD. “We are proud of our close collaboration with Viettel and remain focused on enabling its mobile network to deliver the optimal end-user experience as well as the flexibility to evolve and grow as Viettel’s user base and required bandwidth continue to increase globally.” About Viettel High Tech As the R&D arm of Viettel Group, Viettel High Tech develops full 5G network architecture including 5 layers: Service/App layers, Core layers, Transportation layers, Access layers, Devices; makes Vietnam one of the few countries that can produce 5G equipment. Collaboration with the leading partners is VHT’s strategy. With the desire to experiment, exchange knowledge, further develop diverse fields, VHT is moving to accompany the international high-tech community. About AMD For more than 50 years AMD has driven innovation in high-performance computing, graphics and visualization technologies. Billions of people, leading Fortune 500 businesses and cutting-edge scientific research institutions around the world rely on AMD technology daily to improve how they live, work and play. AMD employees are focused on building leadership high-performance and adaptive products that push the boundaries of what is possible.

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Network Infrastructure,Network Management,Wan Technologies

Verizon continues to deploy 5G Ultra Wideband faster than expected

Verizon | December 06, 2022

Verizon now covers more than 175 million people with their ultra fast, ultra reliable 5G Ultra Wideband service, and will offer nationwide 5G Ultra Wideband in Q1 2023. The ongoing C-Band rollout is a full 13 months ahead of the original schedule, and continues to accelerate. Less than 21 months after announcing the results of the FCC’s C-band auction and after securing early access to an additional 30 markets this year, Verizon accelerated its build plan and surpassed its goal of reaching 175 million people covered by the end of 2022, a month ahead of schedule. “Our customers don’t stand still and neither does our network. Today, more than one out of every two Americans now have access to 5G Ultra Wideband. We know our customers rely on our service every day and we work for them – continuously enhancing, expanding and improving our wireless network. And as proud as I am to have crossed this milestone, I am equally proud of the way we are building our network – with the most advanced technologies, industry leading security, a robust fiber underpinning and a robust and varied spectrum portfolio. We are building this right. We are building this as a platform for innovation for years to come.” Hans Vestberg, Chairman and CEO of Verizon. Verizon’s 5G Ultra Wideband brings power and performance comparable to a wired broadband internet connection to customers’ pockets. With download speeds up to one gigabit per second and the capacity to support data-heavy actions, 5G Ultra Wideband frees people up to do things on the go that many could only do before when connected to their home internet service. This includes everything from downloading huge documents and seamlessly streaming movies in HD audio and video, to playing console quality games and conducting video chats, video conferencing and FaceTime calls with clear sound and video. Verizon customers have much more to look forward to Verizon will continue to build out its 5G Ultra Wideband network using C-band spectrum providing service for millions more customers in the coming months, but Verizon’s engineers are not losing sight of the other critical components that will give customers the most reliable, secure, and robust experience possible on the Verizon network. In addition to providing greater coverage, especially in rural and suburban areas, Verizon will also enhance capacity by activating 100 MHz of C-Band spectrum in many markets, a significant step up from the 60 MHz of spectrum available when deployment first began. Once all of its licensed spectrum is made available, Verizon will have up to 200 MHz of C-Band spectrum deployed in many markets, which will provide exceptional speed and capacity. Complementing the wide coverage of Verizon’s premier C-Band spectrum, Verizon will continue deploying 5G on mmWave spectrum which provides for exponential capacity in areas with significantly dense populations such as venues, stadiums, arenas, airports, major metro areas, office complexes and more. mmWave will also continue to be used for private network deployments when enterprise customers need the fastest, most robust 5G service available for their enterprise applications from wireless manufacturing solutions to connected vehicles to remote healthcare and more. In addition to making 5G more accessible to more people, Verizon will continue focusing on building out the advanced technologies that provide increased security, reliability and customized experiences for customers. Those advancements include fully deploying the 5G core with Verizon’s proprietary cloud platform built specifically for telco workloads, advancing the fiber network to handle exponential increases in data traffic, continuing massive virtualization of the network to add programmability and flexibility into the network, using artificial intelligence to drive reliability and performance, continuing to develop edge computing capabilities to drive down latency, and continuing to advance antenna configurations to drive speed and efficiency.

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Events