A technical look at 5G mobile device energy efficiency

| February 27, 2020

article image
Reducing the level of energy consumption associated with cellular network operations is a strong focus area for Ericsson, and a key sustainability improvement goal. Our post on 5G energy consumption highlights advances in network energy efficiency, but the energy consumed by individual mobile devices also needs to be considered. For example, many components contribute to the energy consumption of a modern smartphone, such as apps, operating systems, and the screen. However, cellular radio also contributes as a critical factor. With 5G, the range of device types is extensive, including built-in modems, smart wearables, and wireless sensors as just a few examples.

Spotlight

Verint

Actionable Intelligence is a necessity in a dynamic world of massive information growth because it empowers organizations with crucial insights and enables decision makers to anticipate, respond, and take action. With Verint solutions and value-added services, organizations of all sizes and across many industries can make more informed, timely, and effective decisions.

OTHER ARTICLES

Operator personal cloud: Engage subscribers with a content hub

Article | June 21, 2021

While many 5G use cases have centered on enterprise opportunities that leverage the speed, responsiveness and capacity of this advanced wireless technology, telecom operators must be careful to not brush off the desires of individual subscribers. They, too, are looking to make the most of their 5G data plans and investments in 5G-enabled mobile devices. Unfortunately for many subscribers, the technology has not yet lived up to its promise. A recent consumer study from Ericsson shows that 70% of smartphone users are disappointed in the availability of new 5G-powered services and apps. The same study also found that subscribers are willing to pay 20-30% more for a premium 5G plan bundled with digital service use cases. Taken together, these two data points indicate that the time has come for operators to develop a 5G strategy focused on increasing value-added services for the subscriber. Operators who want to remain competitive as well as recoup their infrastructure investments must think beyond simply providing enhanced connectivity. Today's consumers are savvy, use multiple connected devices and are short on time. And they expect a lot more from their digital service providers.

Read More

5G Challenges: Exploring the Biggest Challenges for 5G Deployment

Article | June 21, 2021

5G promises exciting advances for communications service providers (CSPs), but the 5G rollout is going to be challenging. CSPs must rapidly build out dense, low-latency edge networks in ways that are affordable, secure, and easily maintainable. CSPs are looking toward open-source, container-based network infrastructures that meet the 5G latency, reliability, and flexibility requirements while being inexpensive to deploy and maintain.

Read More

Reducing mobility interruption time in 5G networks

Article | June 21, 2021

The next steps for 3GPP, release 16 and 17, will introduce additional features to further enhance the support for new use cases related to smart manufacturing, connected vehicles, electrical power distribution and more, such as drones which are controlled by the network. All of these potentially critical use cases require ultra-reliable low-latency communication (URLLC) which means high reliability and availability, as well as very low end-to-end latency in the range of a few milliseconds. The 5G system is designed with this in mind, and the continued evolution of 5G New Radio (NR) will continue to optimize mobility performance further. A critical part of this is to reduce the handover interruption time between cells in the 5G network.

Read More

5G Needs Edge Computing to Deliver on Its Promises

Article | June 21, 2021

Edge computing will be a key enabler for 5G to deliver on its bandwidth and latency requirements. In the short term, it can enable developers to provide a “5G experience” at scale. In the long term, it will be necessary to optimise customer experience for real-time, data hungry applications. Telecoms operators have reported that 5G in the lab can deliver network speeds that are more than twenty times faster than LTE1. But, this does not reflect the experience of the average user. And 5G roll out in many countries will be limited in terms of coverage and capabilities for several more years, given that the ultra-low latency standards will only be revealed in 3GPP’s Release 16 later this year. This is why it is likely that, for 5G to deliver on its promises, it must be coupled with edge computing.

Read More

Spotlight

Verint

Actionable Intelligence is a necessity in a dynamic world of massive information growth because it empowers organizations with crucial insights and enables decision makers to anticipate, respond, and take action. With Verint solutions and value-added services, organizations of all sizes and across many industries can make more informed, timely, and effective decisions.

Events