5G And The User Experience

| April 18, 2017

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What will 5G really be like? The wireless industry has coalesced around three primary use cases for 5G: enhanced mobile broadband, the Internet of Things and ultra-low latency applications. 5G envisions super-fast data rates for each user, massive machine-to-machine communications in which billions of devices send short bursts of information to other systems, and futuristic applications like autonomous cars and augmented reality.

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OTHER ARTICLES

A strong US 5G sector promises good jobs and better security

Article | April 2, 2020

On Dec. 12, 1901, Italian inventor Guglielmo Marconi demonstrated the very first transatlantic radio-wave transmission and ushered in a new age of wireless communications. More than a century later, wireless technology still is one of our primary sources of communication. But as our radio-wave highways become increasingly congested, each new generation of wireless technology is forced to ascend into higher and higher frequencies. The fifth generation of wireless technology, known as “5G,” will expand into spectrum bands Marconi could never have foreseen. Because it will allow data to be transmitted more quickly and efficiently than ever before, 5G technology has the potential to improve everything from search and rescue missions and medical care to transportation, real-time language translation and precision farming. It could allow firefighters to use thermal imaging to see through smoke and locate victims more easily. It could help specialists perform remote robotic surgery on patients who are far away.

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How 5G and edge computing can enhance virtual reality

Article | April 8, 2020

The current global pandemic is drastically impacting our daily lives, and as a result, the relevance of such digital applications and services is accelerating. For example, we suddenly see an increased need for communication services, tools for remote collaboration, and fast and reliable access to data – whether it’s from the office, the home or somewhere in between. Augmented and virtual reality (AR and VR) are two technology concepts providing significant benefits in this new digital reality. These technologies open new ways of working in areas such as manufacturing, gaming, media, automotive and healthcare, allowing for both increased productivity and completely new user experiences. In the Ericsson ConsumerLab merged reality report, 7 out of 10 early adopters expect VR and AR to change everyday life fundamentally.

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5G Needs Edge Computing to Deliver on Its Promises

Article | February 11, 2020

Edge computing will be a key enabler for 5G to deliver on its bandwidth and latency requirements. In the short term, it can enable developers to provide a “5G experience” at scale. In the long term, it will be necessary to optimise customer experience for real-time, data hungry applications. Telecoms operators have reported that 5G in the lab can deliver network speeds that are more than twenty times faster than LTE1. But, this does not reflect the experience of the average user. And 5G roll out in many countries will be limited in terms of coverage and capabilities for several more years, given that the ultra-low latency standards will only be revealed in 3GPP’s Release 16 later this year. This is why it is likely that, for 5G to deliver on its promises, it must be coupled with edge computing.

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Demand for compute remains strong in 1Q21

Article | May 20, 2021

Demand for data center compute continues to be strong and we believe 1Q21 would have been even stronger had it not been for the semiconductor supply shortage. We learned from vendors that the flow of server CPUs out of TSMC and Intel’s fabs was steady in 1Q21 but supply of other components necessary to build a server was tight, including power semis, BMC and PCB substrate.

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Directive Consulting

Directive does beautiful search marketing for B2B and enterprise companies that share our values. We redefine the global standard for how marketers work, live, and grow. We are a group of SEO, PPC and content experts who are passionate about working with the best B2B brands in the world. When we are not executing ROI driven campaigns, you can find us drinking cold brew, volunteering in our community, or playing an intense game of ping-pong.

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